The Great Migration (11th - 16th July 2023)

PRICE: AED 7000

What is the Great Migration? Throughout the year, East Africa’s wide-open grasslands are the setting for the Great Migration as millions of wildebeests, Burchell’s zebras, antelopes and other herd animals make the trek from the Serengeti in Tanzania to the Masai Mara in Kenya

 

Is it worth all the hype? Absolutely! The Great Migration is an amazing phenomenon. … Because so many animals rely on wildebeest and zebra for food, the Migration attracts many other species while moving through the landscape, making for unique sightings of diverse species.

 

Who are you travelling with ?
A group of positive people, 80% dont know eachother, but all of them come back as one family 😍
– we  will orgnise several meetings for the team to get to know eachother better so you have better time there
__

WHAT IF YOU WANTED TO CANCEL
WE RETURN EVERYTHING IF WE FOUND A REPLACEMENT AND WITHOUT REPLACEMENT IF ITS DONE 3 WEEKS BEFORE
IN CASE TESTED POSITIVE, EVERYTHING WILL BE REFUNDED , THE FLIGHT TICKET  COST WILL BE GIVEN AS A VOUCHER
IN CASE OF CANCELLATION,ONE WEEK BEFORE THE TRIP ,THE FLIGHT WILL NOT BE CANCELLED BUT CAN BE POSTPONED, THE REST WILL BE RETURNED
NAVY IS A COMUNNITY, WHICH IS MORE LIKE A FAMILY , BE SURE THAT WE WILL TAKE CARE OF YOU
IN CASE TESTED POSITIVE, WE WILL HAPPILY TAKE CARE OF YOUR ACCOMMODATION AND RETURN FLIGHT

Travel Dates: 11th – 16th July 2023


Navy to Bosnia (1st - 6th June 2023)

PRICE: AED 3700

Travel Dates: 1st – 6th June


Navy to Peru (8th-21st December)

PRICE: AED 14500

Travel Dates: Navy to Peru (8th-21st December)


Navy to Nepal (November 30th -Dec 4th)

PRICE: AED 4200

Travel Dates: November 30th – Dec 4th


Navy to Kilimanjaro (26th Nov - 4th Dec)

WHAT IS NOT INCLUDED

-Visa fees if required
-Pcr test
– travel insurance
-Single room if you wish to upgrade

PRICE: AED 11500

Mount Kilimanjaro is a dormant volcano in Tanzania. It has three volcanic cones: Kibo, Mawenzi, and Shira. It is the highest mountain in Africa and the highest single free-standing mountain in the world: 5,895 metres above sea level and about 4,900 metres above its plateau base

 

The longer itinerary means that it has a good acclimatization profile. You can naturally “walk high, sleep low” which helps with acclimatisation.

You will have a tough summit night ,
You will be trekking for long periods of time so a good level of fitness and stamina is recommended.

 

FOOD & DRINK

Staying well-fed on your climb is absolutely vital, especially when conditions are such that you might not want to eat or drink as much as you should. Because so many climbers experience a loss of appetite at altitude, our head chef has developed special menu plans that are appealing, healthy, and filled with all the energy you need to make it to the summit. By default, the meals include fresh fruit and vegetables every day.

 

CLIMBING BAG WEIGHT

Kilimanjaro National Park operates an absolutely strict limit of 15kg per porter for your main equipment bag. This limit includes  This is more than sufficient for your needs on the mountain. Your bag will be weighed before you leave the hotel to start the climb and if it is overweight you will have to take items out and leave them at the hotel. Additional porters can be hired but they cost up 2 $35 per day

Spending more days hiking at high altitudes, with an effective extra day’s accgiving a better success rate to reach the peak but price increases!

 

INSURANCE

Climbing a mountain as high as Kilimanjaro does have dangers. You should ensure that you have good insurance to cover these risks. It is a condition of booking to climb Kilimanjaro that you have medical and accident insurance.

Your insurance must cover helicopter evacuation if it becomes necessary. It should also cover the costs of getting home should you miss your scheduled flight due to accident, injury, illness or simple bad luck.

Your insurance must specifically include cover you to climb up to 6000m.

Your insurance should also protect against the standard travel dangers, including: baggage delay, loss of personal items etc.
We recommend the global supplier of travel insurance, World Nomads. Make sure to add ‘hiking up to 6,000m’ on check out and be sure to read the small print carefully for any policy you are considering. Different policies provide different levels of cover, so make sure you understand what is and is not included in your policy

 

HEALTH

Malaria and Mosquitoes

The entire Kilimanjaro region is the home of malaria-carrying mosquitoes, and you are at risk of contracting malaria at least until you climb above 3000 metres. Above that, mosquitoes can not survive. A bout of malaria can ruin your entire trip and end your climb early, so it is best to protect yourself.

Your doctor can prescribe anti-malarial medications, but we also recommend wearing long sleeves and trousers, as well as using a good mosquito repellent that contains DEET the entire time you are below 3000 metres.

 

AVOIDING DIARRHOEA

Make sure that your hygiene is as good as possible to avoid picking up a stomach upset. Needless to say, a bout of diarrhoea can make a week-long strenuous ascent unpleasant or even impossible.

On the climb itself, we make sure that your food is pure and uncontaminated, and that all of your water is treated with WaterGuard purification tablets. Before your trek, though, you will have to protect yourself.

Make sure you follow these simple rules at all times:

If you are not absolutely certain water is pure, do not drink it.
Wash your hands thoroughly after using the toilet, and before eating or handling food of any kind.
Do not eat raw vegetables or salads. Cooked, preferably boiled veggies only.
Avoid any cold drinks, and ice of any kind.
Water from sealed bottles is generally fine, as are fizzy drinks, wine and beer. Hot tea and coffee are good, as they have just been boiled.

If you do get diarrhoea, the most important thing you can do is to stay hydrated. The best thing to drink is a rehydration solution like Dioralyte. Read more about dehydration below.

Over the counter medicines like Immodium (or anything containing loperamide) are only for short term, mild diarrhoea. Some doctors recommend taking a single, 500mg dose of Ciprofxin, or any ciprofloxacin antibiotic in an emergency situation. This is a prescription medicine, and you should discuss it with your doctor before your trip.

 

PREVENTING DEHYDRATION

Even if you avoid diarrhoea, you can easily become dehydrated at high altitudes. The lower air pressure forces you to breathe more quickly and deeply, and you lose a lot of water through your lungs. You will also be exerting yourself, and sweating.

The upshot is, as you might expect, that you will have to drink more water. You need to drink at least 3 litres of fluids every day while climbing. Even when you don’t feel thirsty you have to drink this amount as a minimum – preferably more. This is particularly important on the final day when you attempt the summit and could mean the difference between success or failure.

On summit night you should drink at least half a litre (preferably a whole litre) before you set off. We will also supply you with 2 litres of water to fill your own water bottles or hydration bladder. Make sure it does not freeze! Wrapping the bottles in thick socks or otherwise insulating them is usually enough.

Stay on the look-out for signs of dehydration in yourself and your fellow climbers. The most common symptoms include thirst, dry lips, nose or mouth, headache and feeling fatigued or lethargic. If you think you may be dehydrated, there are two ways to tell:

The colour of your urine. Clear or light straw-coloured urine means you are probably not dehydrated. Yellow or orange wee means you have not been drinking enough, and you need to up your fluid intake quickly.
Pinch or press firmly on an area of exposed skin. If it does not spring back instantly, or stays pale and bloodless for more than a second or two, you are probably dehydrated.

Remember to keep drinking on the way down the mountain, as well.

 

SUNBURN AND UV PROTECTION

While a high climb is hardly a day at the seaside, you will be vulnerable to sunburn if not properly protected. The thin atmosphere at high altitudes blocks much less UV radiation, even on cloudy days.

The three most important things you can do to avoid sunburn are:

Apply SPF 30 or higher sunscreen to your face, nose and ears at least 30 minutes before going out into the sun, and reapply regularly. High SPF lip balm is also a must.

Wear a wide-brimmed hat that shades your face, nose and ears.
Wear UV-protective sunglasses, category 2-4.
At higher altitudes the sun’s rays are intensified and even on a cloudy day they can penetrate through and still burn you. And do not forget that the sun is at its strongest between 10:00-14:00 hours each day.

 

EATING WELL

Many climbers experience loss of appetite at high altitudes. This is a real problem, as you will be burning an extra 2000 or more calories a day, and not replacing them can cause real problems, especially when you attempt the summit.

Just like staying hydrated, you have to eat heartily even if you are not hungry. Meals heavy in carbohydrates are best, because they are easier to digest at high altitudes and provide long-term energy.

The summit ascent is different. You will not have a big, heavy meal which might slow you down on the most intensive part of the climb, but rather a light snack and a hot drink. It is important to keep plenty of small snacks with you on this leg, as you will have to keep your energy levels high. Also, make sure they do not freeze – so keep them in pockets underneath your jacket, or in an insulated bag like your daypack.

Summit snacks should be chosen carefully. Take a favourite treat to make it easier to eat when you do not feel hungry, but avoid anything with honey or syrup, or anything chewy as they are likely to freeze tooth-crackingly solid above 5000 metres. Chocolate, nuts and seeds, biscuits, savoury snacks and boiled sweets are generally better choices.

 

BODY TEMPERATURE

Every mountain has its own climate, and Kilimanjaro has several different weather zones at different heights and on different faces of the mountain. Conditions change quickly, and you will be moving between zones as well. A hot and dry day can be followed immediately by snow or rain. Wearing a layered outfit is generally the wisest way to make sure you stay healthy and reasonably comfortable in all conditions.

Above all, make sure to wear warm, wind-and water-proof, breathable clothing on your climb. Get high quality gear too, as this is definitely the real thing. Storms, high winds and freezing temperatures must be expected, and poor quality equipment will fail.

 

ALTITUDE SICKNESS

Altitude sickness, also called Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS), hypobaropathy and soroche, is an illness caused by exposure to the low air pressure, especially low partial pressure of oxygen, which many climbers experience at high altitudes.

AMS is caused by exerting yourself at high altitudes, especially if you have not been properly acclimatised. It is most common at altitudes above 2400 metres. Kilimanjaro is nearly 6000m above sea level. At this height, the air pressure (and the amount of oxygen it contains) is less than half that at sea level, and has been said to be comparable to working with only one lung.

AMS can be serious, especially as it can be debilitating, and it generally occurs far from places where medical treatment can be easily administered.

Not everyone suffers from AMS, of course, and it is very difficult to predict who is or is not vulnerable to it. Generally speaking, a fit person is less vulnerable than an unfit person, because their cardiovascular system can operate at low pressures longer without as much strain. Even so, anyone can be vulnerable at altitudes above 3500 metres, no matter their fitness level, if they have not spent some time getting used to the low atmospheric pressures first.

 

AVOIDING ALTITUDE SICKNESS

1. Walk high, sleep low. It is best to gradually climb higher each day, then descend lower to sleep. This lets you gradually become accustomed to lower pressures, and then recover somewhat overnight.

2. Slow and steady. You need to keep your respiration rate low enough to maintain a normal conversation. If you are panting or breathing hard, you must slow down. Overworking your heart and lungs substantially increases your chance of becoming ill.

3. Drink much more water than you think you need. Proper hydration helps acclimatisation dramatically. You need to drink at least three litres each day. As dehydration presents many of the same symptoms as altitude sickness, your chances of being allowed to continue are best if you stay hydrated.

4. Diamox. The general consensus of the research is that Diamox is helpful in avoiding AMS. We use it when climbing Kilimanjaro. We recommend you google Diamox and its effects yourself. It is a prescription drug, and you should consult with your doctor before taking it.

 

MEDICATION

Your guide carries a first aid kit at all times but we recommend you carry the following items: – Painkillers – Anti-inflammatory tablets/gel – Second Skin Elastoplast (to prevent blisters)/ bandages – Sunscreen for lips and skin – After sun cream (for sunburn)

Travel Dates: 26th NOV – 4th DEC


Navy to Azerbaijan (1st - 6th Nov)

PRICE: AED 2800

THE LAND OF FIRE
AZERBIJAN

NO VISA REQUIRED FOR UAE RESIDENTS

NO VACCINATION IS REQUIRED

 

VERY AFFORDABLE

1-6 NOVEMBER 😍

 

WHAT’S INCLUDED

BUS TO TAKE YOU TO THE AIRPORT , AND WILL DROP YOU BACK TO YOUR HOME WHEN YOU ARE BACK

FLIGHT TICKETS ✈
5 NIGHTS HOTEL 🏨
BREAKFAST-LUNCH 🍖 -DINNER 🥗
ALL ENTERY FEES 🎟
NATURE 🏜 🏞
CULTURE 👨‍🚒🧝‍♀️
HISTORY 🛖🪵🧝‍♂️
HIKING ⛰
ADVENTURES👯‍♂️🤺

MIXTURE OF THE BEST THINGS TO DO IN ONE TRIP

 

VERY VERY AFFORDABLE
2800
INCLUDING ALL
😁😁😁😁

 

CAPACITY
15 AMAZING PEOPLE

Travel Dates: 1st – 6th Nov


Navy to Tanzania (3rd - 9th October)

PRICE: AED 5800

Travel Dates: 3 to 9 October